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administration is rejecting calls to plant -- grand, sita nsa leaker edward snowden. in a letter given to a german lawmaker last week, snowden called on the u.s. to drop charges against him, writing "speaking the truth is not a crime." on sunday, dan pfeiffer ruled out clemency and said snowden should return to face criminal charges. in some of the latest snowden's disclosures, the "new york times" reports the nsa intercepted the talking points of view into secretary -- you would secretary-general ban ki- moon ahead of a meeting with president obama in april. we will have more on the story with the reporter scott shane after the headlines. a newly disclosed document shows the british government justified detaining the partner journalist glenn greenwald by accusing him of espionage and terrorism. in august, david maranda was on his way home to brazil when he was held from his nine hours at london's heathrow airport. he faced repeated interrogation, had many personal items seized, .ncluding some -- thumb drives an internal police order authorizing greatest attention from that they says -
on leaks by edward snowden. in a moment we will be joined by journalist glenn greenwald who first broke the snowden story. first, we turn to saturday's protest in washington. it was organized by the stop watching us coalition. jesselyn radack, a former justice department who now works for the government accountability project, read a message from edward snowden. >> we are here to remind our government officials that they are public service -- servants. this is about the unconstitutional, unethical, and immoral actions of the modern- day surveillance state, and how we all must work together to remind the government to stop them. know,bout our right to our right to associate freely, and to live in a free and open democratic society. [applause] witnessing an american moment in which ordinary people from high school to high office stand up to oppose a dangerous trend in government. we are told what is unconstitutional is not illegal. but we will not be fooled. we have not forgotten the fourth amendment in our bill of rights prohibits government that only from searching our personal effects
snowden. the former national security agency contractor who released thousands of classified documents about government surveillance in one of the most significant leaks in u.s. history. he's been charged with espionage and has been living in russia under temporary asylum. the american journalist at the center of the story lives in brazil. >> we've had to come to rio to speak to glenn greenwald. he hasn't returned to the united states since he broke the story about the nsa surveillance programs for fear of being prosecuted. >> the nsa's goal really is the elimination of privacy globally. it is literally a system designed to monitor all forms of human behavior inside the united states, which is the ultimate surveillance state. >> last december, glenn greenwald received an email from a person who didn't identify himself. >> we still didn't know who he was, where he worked, but he was saying he had access to large amounts of very sensitive surveillance information that show the united states government was violating the law and abusing it's power. >> suddenly in my lap had dropped some of
edward snowden, a spanish newspaper reported the nsa collected numbers and locations of the phone calls, but not actual content. this after learning that the nsa has also been tuning into the communications up dirty five world leaders. now the european union parliamentary delegation is preparing for a visit to the u.s. to express concerns over nsa surveillance tactics. political commentator sam sacks brings us more. >> german intelligence officials will come to washington dc to demand answers from the white house about surveillance on chancellor angela merkel. is a marked the partner from just a few months ago, when germany was defending its foes cooperation with the nsa. that was after edward snowden leak in june that the nsa was collecting a half ilya and telephone and internet telik communications every month. chancellor angela merkel was put to defend her government's cooperation with the nsa, saying it prevented terrorist attacks. we can only protect the population if we cooperate with others, her office said. edward snowden describe the cozy relationship between german spies and t
. in the stream of new revelations from the snowden documents, it can be hard to grasp. sure, the government is collecting information, but what does that really mean for someone's life? to find out, we went to a meet a group of people who definitely know they're being spied on. >> after 9/11 it wasn't just the nsa that increased surveillance on u.s. citizens. here at the city level in new york, the nypd actually brought in two senior officials from the cia to help run a program to spy on its own citizens. >> the program, which was uncovered by the associated press, is targeting one community: muslims. secret documents show that the nypd is conducting surveillance of entire muslim neighborhoods and infiltrating dozens of mosques and muslim student groups. >> they visited bookstores, they visited cafes, they visited hookah joints, and of course they visited mosques... >> informants record conversations using hidden microphones, collect the names and phone numbers of congregants and even photograph them. >> they were listening for, you know, what were people talking about, how were they reacti
a big deal of it now though? >> the snowden leaks shoved it from the shadows and this quiet understanding out into the spotlight. >> how embarrassed is she? she is basically the empress with no clothes. the u.s. was tapping her cell phone. what is fascinating to the story is, yes, everybody knows and there are treaties we have with certain countries countries and we entered into this. we will not spy. we don't have the treaty with germany. there is no international law that says they can't do this. germany is lobbying with the united nations to have a resolution to ban the u.s. spying. what does president obama do? he voluntarily relinquished his own power. this is completely unprecedented. this is super important. economically no countries are investing in the united states. nobody wants to store their data here anymore. they want a data secure bank of switzerland. it is totally ruining the industry. so we have senator feinstein and a lot of democrats calling for accountability. that's for the nsa spying on american citizens. where is the committee looking into the nsa and
with foreign leaders. this is since ed snowden, the president has seen these world leaders. you have to assume the intelligence committee was willfully hiding something from him or they're so incompetent they didn't tell him. that doesn't excuse everybody in the white house. what did hillary clinton know? what about susan rice? tom donna lynn? samantha power? where's piniella? do we have a completely lawless nsa? i think that is the thing that is sim plausible. the white house tried to claim that this stopped. after a review, this practice stopped. okay, well, both things can't be true. it can't be true that the white house reviewed it unless -- and stopped it and the president didn't know about it unless they don't tell the president anything and somebody made this decision on their own. >> and you also feel this is anything new that's going on -- >> i hope not. i hope not -- >> i guarantee if these countries had the opportunity to tap into president obama's bl k blackber blackberry, they would do it in a second. >> i find it shocking he wouldn't know. because i've seen the president's brief
not been a highlight of the edward snowden documents but shows how america is using the information to collect foreign information. >> p.j. crowley, european leaders are expressing outrage. how much of that is legitimate? how many of them had known that this is happening? >> well, there is an intelligence issue, and beneath the surface there is a deep relationship among intelligence that serve american interests as well as european interests, a lot of cooperation and information sharing, which is why there has been progress in combating terrorism. we're in a better position than, say, 12 years ago. the united states has been through this before with wikileaks. you had 250,000 state department documents, many classified cables. you've got awkward conversations. how could european leaders say how could you call me vain. but obviously at the end of the day interest drive relationships but politics makes relationships. you're seeing steps being taken politically to try to manage this, and stabilize the situation. it will obviously take some ti time. >> mike rogers, chairman of the intel
sets guidelines for the nsa bold collection of information. former contractor edward snowden leet important information on how -- leaked detailed information on how this is done. a number of proposals have been sent to improve transparency and strengthen privacy protections to further build the confidence of the american public and our nations fisa programs. i am joined now by sam sacks, who is live at the capital. the hearing was supposed to consider a number of proposals.e proposals entail? >> good to be with you. just to recap, the pfizer court is this top-secret court -- this fisa court is this top-secret court that provides the oversight over the nsa. they have to go to this court to get a lot of these court orders. the problem is that nobody really knows what goes i inside. the opinions are classified. there's only one arguer and it is from the government and there is no one representing the privacy of the individual from whom the government is turned to get information from. so today was about getting more transparency and a number of ideas were brought up, such as a proces
. >>> and edward snowden says british counterparts to the nsa are some of the worst offenders to government oversight. >>> welcome to "around the world." police came within minutes of stopping the alleged l.a.x. shooter from heading to the airport before friday's rampage. one. new details we're learning today. this is from an exclusive interview with a woman who knows the suspect and his three roommates. 23-year-old paul ciancia is charged with murdering a tsa officer. ciancia is in critical condition after being shot by police officers. the fbi says he set out to kill tsa employees, and now a woman who knows the suspect tells our miguel marquez, that one roommate, who had no idea what was going on, even drove him to the airport. >> he asked one of the roommates if he could have a ride to the airport. >> why did he need a ride? >> he said he was going back home. either that his dad was kind of sick and he had to deal with some family issues. >> did anyone ever see a ticket? >> no. >> he did mention what day. that morning, he doesn't knock and says, i need to leave. can you take me now. >> d
article has proven that. >> some of the things that ed snowden reported, let me read from the "washington post." in the preceding 30 days, the report said, field collectors had processed and sent back 181 million new records, including met a data indicating who sent e-mails as well as content and text. these are mind-boggling revelations. >> let me just ask any journalist or viewer who is listening to this whether or not, when thinking about mr. snowden, they would prefer to have remained ignorant about all the things they have learned that their own government is doing to their privacy and their communications completely in the dark and with no accountability. even if you're somebody who believes you want a state that collects everybody's communications which is a daunting thing. but if you believe that, shouldn't we in a democracy know these things, know our government is doing that? the only reason we know is because mr. snowden informed us all and risked his liberty. >> are we going to learn more liberties that are being violated on an ongoing basis? >> definitely. i've been asked thi
snowden who dumped all of this information out in to the public arena. met with him last week in russia. he said he would try to enlist his help to investigate the nsa and suggested that he be brought back to this country and given clemency. what would be your reaction to that? >> my reaction would be negative. first of all, this is an american, he was a contractor he was tested. he stripped our system, he had an opportunity if what he was was a whistle blower to pick up the phone to call the house intelligence committee, the senate intelligence committee and say, look, i have some information you ought to see. and we would certainly see him. maybe both together, maybe separately but we would have seen him and we would have looked at that information. that didn't happen. and now he's done this enormous disservice to our country. and i think the answer is, no clemency. >> schieffer: in other words, if the united states could get their hands on him you would suggest that he be prosecuted. >> that's correct. >> schieffer: let me shift to the roll out of obamacare. this thing seems to b
from spain. this is based on documents provided by edward snowden. >> arriving for an uncomfortable meeting, the u.s. ambassador in major it has questions to answer after a spanish newspaper published elite documents showing u.s. intelligence services tracked more than 60 million phone calls made in spain between december and january of this year. a massive 3.5 million calls in one day. they say the monitoring appears to track where the calls were made and how long they lasted, but not their content. the spanish government has demanded full details about what information was collected from their citizens. >> as always, we learn about what is going on after it has happened. that is how it is with american intelligence. they are always ahead of us. >> it is a disgrace they are spying on governments and ministers. we will see what happens, but to me, this is a very serious violation. >> it comes after the prime rejected calls for an eu wide no-spying agreement. they wanted more information before supporting the special arrangement with the united states. he white house has denied that
's aw at this hour, star with the latest leak from former nsa contractor edward snowden. says theington post" national security agency has been hacking be data links that connect google and yahoo! around the world. laways the agency skirt the by collecting data from millions of local web users via underwater fiber-optic cables. kate moody explains. >> world leaders, foreign citizens, and internet giants, the latest victims of the national security agency's surveillance programs according to intelligence linked by edward snowden. the nsa has admitted to the program to access internet user accounts but described new reports that infiltrated yahoo! and google databases as factually incorrect. breakings not an essay into any databases. it would be illegal for us to do that. -- does collect information on terrorists and our national intelligence priorities, but we are not authorized to go into a u.s. company's servers and take data. we have to go to a court process for doing that. >> but the "washington post" says there is more to the story, reporting details of a separate over program-- nsa
. a lawyer for edward snowden says the whistle-blower slash trader has found a new job in the glamorous world of on-line tech support. and -- >> there is no h anywhere in that word. >> he told a russian news agency that his client's dig starts on friday. he wouldn't name the company he was working at saying only that it is with a major russian website. it is probably their facebook made of wood. do you like that joke? >> i have an antiquated russian russian -- go ahead. >> he fled the u.s. after making america less safe by letting terrorists know how we go about our spying. meanwhile, snowden was recently filmed on a store security camera and he is at the bottom. >> i think that is a metaphor for what snowden has done to the united states of america and also that was a liquor store and it sucked. andy, you must just want to burst into tears when you see how far your hero and traitor snowden has fallen. ha, ha i say and so which i add another ha with a square above it. >> first of all it was his lawyer and not his agent. >> who needs a lawyer to get you an i.t. job? >> he is the one telling pe
that killed a u.s. ambassador. >> accused nsa leaker edward snowden making new friends and maybe looking for a new home. germany maybe? >> and unearthed a drug tunnel between mexico and the united states that is so sophisticated, it is being called a supertunnel. we're going to take you on a tour. welcome to around the world". i'm suzanne malveaux. >> i'm michael holmes. thanks for your company today. welcome to our international viewers with us all week. >> first we're going to get to this, benghazi, libya, it was just last ept, four americans were killed in a terrorist attack. one of them the u.s. ambassador. >> today a lot of pressure from republicans in congress to hear directly from cia operatives who were in libya during the attack and also afterwards. so far they have not talked to congress. >> we here at cnn have reported the cia has specifically told those operators to keep quiet. drew griffin is with the cnn investigations unit. drew, first of all, excellent reporting on all of this. they're pushing back right now on what you're reporting. what are they saying? >> being complet
's irresponsible with all due respect, mark. >> thank you very much to all of you. >>> up next, edward snowden writes a manifesto and says he has proof he did nothing wrong. talk about whether someone's a patriot or not. that's the question. >>> and later, a true american hero, iron man come to life in the pentagon right now u and a shout out. singer rheanna has done something she's never done before. her current number one is the monster. a collaboration with rapper em. i started part-time, now i'm a manager.n. my employer matches my charitable giving. really. i get bonuses even working part-time. where i work, over 400 people are promoted every day. healthcare starting under $40 a month. i got education benefits. i work at walmart. i'm a pharmacist. sales associate. i manage produce. i work in logistics. there's more to walmart than you think. vo: opportunity. that's the real walmart. could save you fifteen percent or more on car insurance. yep, everybody knows that. well, did you know the ancient pyramids were actually a mistake? uh-oh. geico. fifteen minutes could save you...well, you kno
this was going on but once the snowden documents came out, they had to deal with it politically at home. >> what should they do to handle that? how can we help them at hope, mary? >> i prefer the kind of -- sort of things that senator feinstein is suggesting, which really aren't major changes in the way the policy would work. the fact of the matter is everybody spies. the french intelligence, former french head of intelligence came out last week and said, what are you talking about, everybody's been doing this. helmut schmidt said when he was chancellor of germany he assumed he was being spied on. this has been going on since the cold war. so basically yes, maybe we should provide some cosmetic cover in order to help, for example, merkel regain some trust in the relationship with the u.s. beyond that, i don't think we should do anything. >> dianne feinstein being the chairman of the senate intelligence committee. she's moving some legislation to put some -- a review of all of these things. there's also a report this week, joe, that the nsa was spying, breaking into google and yahoo! networks ove
later, edward snowden began releasing revelations about massive surveillance that our government was doing. this kicked off a healthy public debate about how we balance privacy and security. as you heard from greg, it is our mission at rand to improve the quality of public policy decision-making. that is why we brought together this panel. people who have different views. everyone here has deep expertise. we are hoping to have an open discussion. there will be some things and questions they will be unable to answer because of the situations. we will try to guide the discussion over a few topics. we will start with trying to understand what works with intelligence security and why we feel we need to put measures in place. we are then going to turn to what are the increased risks of mass collection of data on the public? finally, what are the implications of this on how we implement foreign policy. it serves as an overarching of the things i would like to see us cover. i would like to start with the first question on the rent we face and why we need security. if there are no random
million calls in spain in one month. documents provided by nsa leaker edward snowden. the spanish government summoned the american ambassador asking for an explanation. >>> this weekend, thousands of protesters marched on capitol hill demanding an end to the government surveillance program at home and abroad. many carried signs praising snowden and thanking him for blowing wistle on the nsa by leaking classified documents. this comes as international outrage builds over the broad scope of the nsa's data gathering over years. european leaders continue to put pressure on the country to for a new spying deal on allies. chefon, thank you so much for your time. >> thank you. >> let's explain why it is some officials have explained perhaps why the president would not know about this for five years. >> as it was explained to us, this type of surveillance is the type of program or decision that would be executed at the level of the national security agency and the way the protocols are set up at this point, that's sort of where the line of information would stop. there isn't necessarily a
merkel's phone and allowed it to continue. it came out after edward snowden said the u.s. has spied on world leaders. what president obama spoke to chancellor merkel when the two spoke about the spying. >> the president said we're not going to do this going forward. >> but it may have been done in the past. >> we don't want to get into the business of inventorying everything we've done in the past but what we're looking at is how can we both make necessary reforms in how we gather intelligence and how can we be more transparent about what we're doing with our allies and the public. >> joining me now ambassador mark ginsburg. it's great to have you here. the white house finds itself caught between a rock and a hard place. now they have to come out and ask for forgiveness as opposed to permission, because they never would have gotten permission to do this. but this is not unheard of. this is what we do as a country. >> spies r us. >> we've been doing it for a long time. is it just the fact that we are surprised that it would get to this level and now expect to believe that the white h
security agency is under fire because of revelations by former nsa analyst, edwin snowden. s scongressman james sense en brenner is expected to propose a new law, the freedom act, which would stop dragnet collection of phone calls of american citizens, place stronger restrictions on who is targeted and .a special advocate to the super secret fisa courts to protect privacy rights but director of national intelligence james clapper and general keith alexander told the schmidt the content of phone calls remain secret in a virtual lockbox unless there is a link to possible terrorism and that, they say, is rare. >> there wiat would only be loo when we had reasonable and articulable suspicious that we had connection to a foreign al-qaeda or related terrorist group and look into that box. in 2012, we had 88 such selectors that we could go and look into that. >> that's it. of the billions of records, only 28 yeah. >> at the committee hearing, there was relatively little discussion about allegations the u.s. had spied on america's allies but at the whitehouse, it was still a hot topic. press secre
of snowden that the nsa has been doing this incredible vacuum cleaner operation now for a long time in which all these digits from communications all over the world are for good reason sifted, because the terrorist threat is real. and at the same time we need real safeguards. and what snowden has done is to show that we don't have the safeguards that we need, that we need better courts in terms of warrants and how this information is used. we need better oversight, and at the same time we need -- look, secrecy, excessive secrecy about what the government does, not about necessarily what terrorist is being uncovered, that's one thing, but excessive secrecy about the program itself, why the hell would angela merkel be -- her cell phone, why would we be looking at that. >> at some point you have to do a cost benefit analysis. >> well, not a cost benefit analysis, we need an answer. >> you have to say is it worth -- >> no, no, we need an answer of who did this, why was it done, why did it start in the bush years, why didn't somebody -- maybe there's something we don't know about merkel. >> and w
on information from edward snowden, following allegations that president obama approved spying on german chancellor angela merkel. the white house denies that. congressman peter king and former vice president dick chaney said the u.s. should stop apologising for the nsa surveillancism. >> overall intelligence is important and need to be preserved. >> the reality is the nsa saved thousands of lives, not just in the united states, but france and germany and throughout europe. the french are ones to talk - the fact is they've carried out spying against the united states - both government and industry. >> jeanne shaheen of new hampshire takes a different stance, calling on the nsa to come clean about surveillance programs. >> i think the revelations from edward snowden and the secrets that have been revealed are doing significant damage to our bilateral relationships with germany, with mexico, with the other countries where the suggestion is that we've listened in. we have repair twork do. we have hard questions we need to ask of the nsa about what is happening in the program. >> meanwhile -
on other nations, especially our allies and friends. it's all coming from one man, edward snowden and the secrets he made off before he left as a u.s. intelligence analyst. now the white house is scrambling to soothe feelings while fielding questions about how much the president knew. we begin in washington tonight with nbc's andrea mitchell. andrea, good evening. >> reporter: good evening, brian. the white house is under fire from its closest allies. for the first time the president is promising to limit the nsa's extraordinary reach saying what they are able to do doesn't necessarily mean what they should be doing. that likely means not spying on foreign leaders who happen to be good friends and allies. across europe, an uproar today. the u.s. ambassador to spain under siege. called on the carpet to explain reports that the nsa was vacuuming up telephone data, tracking 60 million calls in spain in less than a month according to el mundo. germany today called for an investigation into nsa's tapping of angela merkel's personal cell phone. the interior minister said the chancellor
accordingand yahoo! to edward snowden. new job.und a general alexander said he will be illegal for the nsa to break in to any new bases but what if they tap into [inaudible] cable? is do we have a rogue agency in our hands are not? this goes back to our previous discussion of who is minding the store. we have the director of national knowligence, what does he and when did he know it and when did they tell the president they are instructing on foreign readers? or tell't he tell them the president about the scope of the nsa activity if the director of intelligence new about this. the commander- in-chief in the dark on things like this. you cannot do it. >> there is a long traditional of possible denial. time, tremendous pressure to provide goodies. presidents complaint i have -- there's nothing in here that i have not already read in "the new york times." where are you going to get the special goodies? are are showing they meaningful. >> the president said we would not listen in. would you listen in on angela merkel? president -- >> they are not listening to her conversations. ata thatrt of
into the servers of google and yahoo! according to edward snowden. he has found a new job. nice that the kid has found work. general alexander said it will be illegal for the nsa to break into any databases. what if they tap into underseas cable? and things like that. is that covered by the government oversight? >> the question is do we have a rogue agency in our hands or not? i am not sure. i accept the arguments they are doing all these things but this goes back to our previous discussion of who is minding the store. we have the director of national intelligence, what does he know and when did he know it and when did they tell the president they are eavesdropping on foreign leaders? why didn't he tell them or tell the president about the scope of the nsa activity if the director of intelligence really knew about this? you cannot keep the commander- in-chief in the dark on things like this. you cannot do it. >> there is a long tradition of plausible deniability. and not telling the top guy how you did it. at the same time, tremendous pressure to provide goodies. the morning briefing the a lot
contractor, edward snowden. >> the national security agency took the unusual step thursday of denying a report that'ves drop on the vatican phone calls and may have tapped in on pope francis before he was elected. what are you making up? is this a church, state issue? >> you got in on the consistent, the ones that depict the new pope, john? >> who knows. saved a lot of money. those guys have not done anything that was not known to the national security council and the white house and the idea of blaming these guys who are doing the job they were signed to do and oh my goodness, for miss feinstein, that there's a touch of hypocrisy here. >> there's a lot of outrage. i'm with clapper on this issue as well. i mean, i think because of the technological advances and the fact that we can now, you know, look in on people's cell phones, that you know, there has to be some more guidelines brought into this thing. but overall, friends spy on friends, it's not going to stop. >> what do you think of that? >> i think, well, i'm not enough people, clearly. there's no doubt that this has been g
have with snowden is he had access to classified information. he violated the conditions under which he got those. he is a traitor, pure and simple. and i don't think you can judge him any other way. some people want to say he is a whistle-blower, he is no whistle-blower, he has done enormous damage to the united states by talking about my methods we collect -- about methods we collect intelligence. >> what do you think about edward snowden? is he a genuine whistle-blower, a traitor, a bit of both? >> in effect, i think that -- well, a legitimate whistle-blower is one who is the curator of the information that they're distributing. i didn't feel that that was the case with manning. and i don't think that that is the case with snowden. i did feel that was the case with daniel ellsburgh. i think that we will find forgiveness in our justice system and in our hearts when somebody has called foul on crimes -- by our government against our people. or against other governments or people. but what has become a kind -- the whistle-blower term is being associated with a blitz of information, base
was terminated after the white house learned of it. meanwhile in the latest example of edward snowden screwing over america the spanish newspaper reported that the nsa monitored the 60 million phone calls made in spain -- i didn't know they had that many phones -- last december. they refused to grant snowden asylum. >> see if that is not bullying, i don't know what bullying is, and i think there should be an organization to punish those dogs. did the president know about the spying on merkel or did he not know or did he not not know. >> remember, merkel rhymes with erkle. >> merkel. i don't know if he knew, but there is nobody more frustrated and more outraged than president obama. we should just trust he can get to the bottom. >> i think he is upset. he gets things done. if he didn't know we were listening in on the phone calls of our friendly government leader should he have? shouldn't he let the nsa do what they want to do? >> no, we know two things. he was the last to know and no one is more upset. but it is weird how he knows nothing. he is the last to know other than killing bin laden be
snowden's leaked documents. this time about the nsa tapping world alabalealleys. fault lines correspondent explores what it is like to live under constant surveillance. ♪ >> in many ways the nsa surveillance story can seem abstract. sure the sgovment collecting information, but what does that really mean for someone's life? to fine out we went to meet a group of people who definitely know they are being spied on. >> after 9/11 it wasn't just the nsa that increased surveillance. here at the city level in new york, the nypd brought in to senior officials from the cia to help spy on its own citizens. the program is targeting one community, muslims. secret documents show that the nypd is conducting surveillance of entire muslim neighborhoods. >> they visited book stores, cafes, hookah joints, of course mosques. >> reporter: and record conversations using hidden microphones, collect the names and phone numbers of con gragaits. >> how were they reacting to foreign events abroad, the egyptian revolution or the cartoons about the profit mohammed, what were they saying in the surmonth. >> to just
. on the heels made by dared snowden that the nsa listened in on angela merkel cell phone calls and may have had access from dozens of other world leaders some say it doesn't matter. u.s. intelligence officials all but knit they do spy on america's allies. >> some of this reminds me a lot of the classic movie "casablan a "casablanca." >> my god, gamblizing going on here. some sort of thing. >> reporter: they say one of the way the nsa can reestablish trust. >> if it came forward and was more open and more transparent about what it does and why it does these things, including spying on our friends and allies, i think people may say that makes sense. >> reporter: the vatican responded to the panorama report saying we are not concerned. others say if anyone is listening in on the vatican, there could be good reason. analysts say the papacy is plugged in syria where western intelligence agencies sometimes don't have eyes or ears. >> there are priests and nuns who have boots on the ground in at least places and passing information up the food chain what is really happening and it would not surprise m
snowden met with a german lawmaker in moscow he reportedly said he is willing to testify. he will go to nogermany as longs that country doesn't send him to the us. he said in a manifesto today that he feels justified in spilling intelligence secrets. the german lawmaker who met edward snowden said the confessed leaker wants to testify in front of congress. >> he stressed that he is ready to come before the german parliament to testify and that he would rather go before the pairliment and put the facts on the table. >> she says he is making his own decisions and is not being manipulated by the russians. >> despite the police state surveillance state we have been turning into. i think he would love to come back some day if the conditions plitly were different. >> nsa chief alexander, the turmoil now giving him second thoughts on whether spying on al lies like german chancellor merkel was worth it. >> i think those partnerships have greater value than some of the collection and we ought to look at it like that. >> the intelligence community denies collecting reports from citizens callin
skakel with a golf club. >>> they are rejected nsa leaker, snowden of clemency. no officers or offers are being discussed. snowden should return to the u.s. and face charges. snowden who has temporarily asylum in russia made the plea in a letter. and the head of the senate committee is defending the agency. diane feinstein said on cbs's face the nation, the nsa operate in the direction of other departments. agency recently faced global criticism amid claims it spied on foreign allies. >> i believe the nsa is filled with good patriotic people who want to do the right thing. they follow the orders they are given. as i understand it, these are the priority. three, the nuclear counter proliferation. four, hard targets. and now, cyber. and those are the main areas the nsa is told to do serp things and it doesn't. >> claims on spying, sparked calls for the u.s. to roll back the surveillance programs. president obama has ordered a review of the program. >>> arizona couple, to kick the principal out of school. the father of the boy, met with the head master regarding pictures of a soldier and
about the fallout from the edward snowden leaks. >> this is the most serious leak, most serious compromise in the u.s. intelligence committee. >> because of the amount of it and the type. >> the amount and the type. >> website reboot. secretary of hhs kathleen sebelius faces questions on capitol hill wednesday after healthcare.gov went down over the weekend adding fuel to the criticism and more fodder for snl. >> i have a number of friendly tips to help you deal with those problems. for example, have you tried restarting your computer. sometimes it helps to turn the computer off and turn it back on. we don't know why. it just does. >> poetic license, the literally legend maya angelou joins us this hour. children's love for books. >> good day, i'm andrea mitchell in washington. edward snowden's leaks keep coming faster than the white house can even respond. over the weekend the nsa claimed president obama had no idea angela merkel's personal cell phone was tapped back since 2002. so how credible is that denial? joining me now is chuck todd nbc's white house correspondent, politic
made by former nsa contractor edward snowden. he describes himself as a whistleblower, but others say he's a traitor. >> christiane amanpour has spoken with the journalist who worked closely with edward snowden to expose these secrets and joins you now from london. you had that interview with glenn greenwald. what struck you most about him, he is one determined man on a bit of a mission really. >> he continues to insist that despite the vociferous criticism that officials have leveled at the snowden leaks and at him and the press for publishing them, it is not all about terrorism. he keeps saying loorks, they want us to believe that everything that's being leaked is just about life and death terrorism. but it's not. there are a lot of other revelations, a lot of revelations about economic and commercial and industrial espionage. there are a lot of revelations obviously which started the firestorm of protests around the world. about spying and collecting metadata from ordinary citizens. that is what really drives glen green wald really, really crazy and let me play you just a little bi
to the "washington post" and documents it obtained from the nsa leaker edward snowden. according to this report, field collectors processed, get this, 181,28 181,280,466 new records in one month. an operation of this kind in the united states is illegal. of course the nsa is allowed to operate overseas but not here. what from google and yahoo. released a statement saying the company is troubled by the allegation. a yahoo spokeswoman says we have not given access to our data centers to the nsa or any other government agency. clearly that is not the accusation. the accusation is that the nsa broke in, not that anybody gave anybody permission. in other words, the nsa broke the law. of course there's more. an italian magazine reports that the nsa may have spied on the pope and some cardinals. sources say the magazine -- sources at the magazine have been told that the nsa eavesdropped on vatican phone calls possibly around the time the former pope benedict's successor was under discussion. possibly, it reports before the conclave that top secret meeting of cardinals. a vatican spokesman could not or
controversy continues to spread. in the wakeover it, edward snowden has had a meeting with a german legislator the, present that person with a letter, speaking the truth is not a crime, i am confident that with the support of the international community the government of united states will abandon this harmful practice. he's seeking some kind of clemency. are there any conditions under which president obama would consider clemency? >> none that have been discussed. >> none at all? >> none. >> it's not on the table? >> it's not been on the table. mr. snowden violated u.s. law. our belief has always been that he should return to the united states and face justice. >> finally, rand paul is our next guest, senator rand paul, do you agree with jay carney your white house colleague, that it would be awesome if rand paul ran for president in 2016? >> i suspect that the the 2016 republican nomination is going to be awesome no matter who runs. >> okay, dan pfeiffer, thanks very much. >>> let's go to senator rand paul right there. you heard dan pfeiffer say it's going to be an awesome race. are you goin
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